Restoration Physical Therapy
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Why don’t you take insurance?

“I have gone to traditional PT clinics for years and would rather go to a clinic where I know that I will have the same therapist each session."

Mary Falk PTThis is one of the most frequently asked question I have been getting recently. It is a very good question and as crazy as many people may think me to be, I feel that changing my business model to be a “fee for service” physical therapy practice  in Marysville, WA will better serve my treatment approach.

Just this week I had a new client who chose me because, “I have gone to traditional PT clinics for years and would rather go to a clinic where I know that I will have the same therapist each session. I am looking for a therapist that emphasizes hands-on techniques and not just ultrasound or the same exercises each session.” This client understands the importance of consistency of care, having the same therapist, hour-long therapy sessions, manual therapy treatments and home exercise programs that work.

What I love about my job is helping people get well and teaching them how to stay healthy. I love to learn about treatment techniques that will help me accomplish that goal. I did not become a PT to spend hours at continuing education courses to learn how to decipher the best icd-9 billing codes to get paid or to shuffle from one patient to another to get my 10-15 clients seen each day. Documentation is important but I do not want to spend more time doing paperwork; it is the client I want to be treating.

Insurance companies and Medicare regulations have become increasingly difficult to get paid and most PT clinics have to see multiple clients and utilize PT techs/assistants to stay profitable. They need to hire out a billing staff to negotiate the ever increasingly difficult insurance reimbursement task, therapy denials, and coding issues.

Switching to a cash-based practice has allowed me the ability to lower my rates to make PT affordable for people who do not have insurance. It is a good value for people with Health Savings Accounts or large deductibles. Of course you can continue to see me for therapy and use your insurance benefits. At each visit, a superbill will be provided to turn in to your insurance company for out of network re-imbursement. Clients will find that the out of pocket costs are comparable to in-network co-pays when they factor in lower rates, hour long sessions that yield effective results in less time and home programs that maintain the results.

Your time is important and receiving the best quality care will get you back to work sooner and back to enjoying the things you like to do. Taking myself out of the insurance game will grant me more time to treat my clients in a personalized way that delivers results.

Categories: Alternative healthcare
Post by Mary Falk PT on April 24, 2013

Why don’t you take insurance?

“I have gone to traditional PT clinics for years and would rather go to a clinic where I know that I will have the same therapist each session."

Mary Falk PTThis is one of the most frequently asked question I have been getting recently. It is a very good question and as crazy as many people may think me to be, I feel that changing my business model to be a “fee for service” physical therapy practice  in Marysville, WA will better serve my treatment approach.

Just this week I had a new client who chose me because, “I have gone to traditional PT clinics for years and would rather go to a clinic where I know that I will have the same therapist each session. I am looking for a therapist that emphasizes hands-on techniques and not just ultrasound or the same exercises each session.” This client understands the importance of consistency of care, having the same therapist, hour-long therapy sessions, manual therapy treatments and home exercise programs that work.

What I love about my job is helping people get well and teaching them how to stay healthy. I love to learn about treatment techniques that will help me accomplish that goal. I did not become a PT to spend hours at continuing education courses to learn how to decipher the best icd-9 billing codes to get paid or to shuffle from one patient to another to get my 10-15 clients seen each day. Documentation is important but I do not want to spend more time doing paperwork; it is the client I want to be treating.

Insurance companies and Medicare regulations have become increasingly difficult to get paid and most PT clinics have to see multiple clients and utilize PT techs/assistants to stay profitable. They need to hire out a billing staff to negotiate the ever increasingly difficult insurance reimbursement task, therapy denials, and coding issues.

Switching to a cash-based practice has allowed me the ability to lower my rates to make PT affordable for people who do not have insurance. It is a good value for people with Health Savings Accounts or large deductibles. Of course you can continue to see me for therapy and use your insurance benefits. At each visit, a superbill will be provided to turn in to your insurance company for out of network re-imbursement. Clients will find that the out of pocket costs are comparable to in-network co-pays when they factor in lower rates, hour long sessions that yield effective results in less time and home programs that maintain the results.

Your time is important and receiving the best quality care will get you back to work sooner and back to enjoying the things you like to do. Taking myself out of the insurance game will grant me more time to treat my clients in a personalized way that delivers results.

Categories: Alternative healthcare

Post by Mary Falk PT on April 24, 2013

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Switching to a cash-based practice has allowed me the ability to lower my rates to make PT affordable for people who do not have insurance.

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