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The Squatty Potty: Is there a better way to go?

With the invention of the toilet, the western world embraced the sitting position for our toileting posture.

When I started blogging, I never thought I would be discussing “potty talk”. On the other hand, ever since I was a new PT grad, protecting and strengthening the pelvic floor has been a subject that I have held in utmost importance. So when I learned about the Squatty Potty, it grabbed my attention.

For most of time, people have squatted when they had a bowel movement and even little ones find a quiet corner to squat when they are filling their diapers. However, with the invention of the toilet, the western world embraced the sitting position for our toileting posture.

Anorectal angle sittingBut is the sitting posture serving us well for our elimination needs? A look at the anatomy of our anorectal alignment in sitting as compared to squatting reveals the answer. The puborectalis muscle, a muscle of the pelvic floor, forms a sling around the junction of the anus and rectum. In the sitting position, notice the angulation where these two parts of the large intestine approximate.anorectal angle squatting This kinked position is a good thing most of the time as it helps to maintain continence with no embarrassing leakage. In the squatting position, this muscle is relaxed and the angle is lessened, allowing for easier and more complete elimination.

More and more doctors and healthcare providers are recommending squatting during toileting to relieve conditions such as constipation, hemorrhoids, and other bowel and pelvic problems.Dr. Berko Sikirov’s research found that hemorrhoids were resolved when the toileting posture was switched from sitting to squatting. Eighteen of the twenty patients were completely relieved of their symptoms (pain and bleeding) with no recurrence, even thirty months after completion of the study. He concluded that the causative factor behind hemorrhoids is the excessive straining associated with the sitting position.1

Dr. R. Olson states, “The Squatty Potty realigns the associated internal organs slightly, creating an adventitious angle for both elimination of urine and fecal matter. With the rise of colon cancer, it should be noted that fecal material in a stagnant no-motile form lying against the colon walls could create multiple medical problems. Those that strain while eliminating fecal matter are at severe risk of developing micro tears in the rectal region that can lead to a prolapsed rectum. Women who have difficulty emptying their bladder can greatly benefit by using The Squatty Potty. By slightly altering the angle of the urinary organ alignment during the urinating process, the urological organs are more relaxed. This aids in more effective and complete draining of the bladder.”

Switching from sitting to squatting need not be difficult. All that is needed is placing the Squatty Potty platform around the front of the commode. It comes in three styles and two heights (7’ and 9”). The 7” is a great option for the majority of people whereas the 9” is perfect for higher toilets or if your joints are extremely flexible.

It makes sense to let our natural anatomy dictate our potty posture. It is my firm belief that it is in the little things we do each day that we can make big changes in our quality of life. The Squatty Potty is one of those easy changes that you can make to yield great rewards for healing or prevention of pelvic floor issues, constipation, hemorrhoids, and colon disease.

1 Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 48, No. 7 (July 2003), pp. 1201–1205 ( C2003)
Photos courtesy of squattypotty.com

In the spirit of full disclosure, this is an affiliate link, which means that I may get a commission if you decide to purchase anything from squattypotty.com. I only recommend products & systems that I use and love myself, so I know you’ll be in good hands.

Categories: Constipation, Hemorrhoids, Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), Squatty potty
Post by Mary Falk PT on September 20, 2013

The Squatty Potty: Is there a better way to go?

With the invention of the toilet, the western world embraced the sitting position for our toileting posture.

When I started blogging, I never thought I would be discussing “potty talk”. On the other hand, ever since I was a new PT grad, protecting and strengthening the pelvic floor has been a subject that I have held in utmost importance. So when I learned about the Squatty Potty, it grabbed my attention.

For most of time, people have squatted when they had a bowel movement and even little ones find a quiet corner to squat when they are filling their diapers. However, with the invention of the toilet, the western world embraced the sitting position for our toileting posture.

Anorectal angle sittingBut is the sitting posture serving us well for our elimination needs? A look at the anatomy of our anorectal alignment in sitting as compared to squatting reveals the answer. The puborectalis muscle, a muscle of the pelvic floor, forms a sling around the junction of the anus and rectum. In the sitting position, notice the angulation where these two parts of the large intestine approximate.anorectal angle squatting This kinked position is a good thing most of the time as it helps to maintain continence with no embarrassing leakage. In the squatting position, this muscle is relaxed and the angle is lessened, allowing for easier and more complete elimination.

More and more doctors and healthcare providers are recommending squatting during toileting to relieve conditions such as constipation, hemorrhoids, and other bowel and pelvic problems.Dr. Berko Sikirov’s research found that hemorrhoids were resolved when the toileting posture was switched from sitting to squatting. Eighteen of the twenty patients were completely relieved of their symptoms (pain and bleeding) with no recurrence, even thirty months after completion of the study. He concluded that the causative factor behind hemorrhoids is the excessive straining associated with the sitting position.1

Dr. R. Olson states, “The Squatty Potty realigns the associated internal organs slightly, creating an adventitious angle for both elimination of urine and fecal matter. With the rise of colon cancer, it should be noted that fecal material in a stagnant no-motile form lying against the colon walls could create multiple medical problems. Those that strain while eliminating fecal matter are at severe risk of developing micro tears in the rectal region that can lead to a prolapsed rectum. Women who have difficulty emptying their bladder can greatly benefit by using The Squatty Potty. By slightly altering the angle of the urinary organ alignment during the urinating process, the urological organs are more relaxed. This aids in more effective and complete draining of the bladder.”

Switching from sitting to squatting need not be difficult. All that is needed is placing the Squatty Potty platform around the front of the commode. It comes in three styles and two heights (7’ and 9”). The 7” is a great option for the majority of people whereas the 9” is perfect for higher toilets or if your joints are extremely flexible.

It makes sense to let our natural anatomy dictate our potty posture. It is my firm belief that it is in the little things we do each day that we can make big changes in our quality of life. The Squatty Potty is one of those easy changes that you can make to yield great rewards for healing or prevention of pelvic floor issues, constipation, hemorrhoids, and colon disease.

1 Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 48, No. 7 (July 2003), pp. 1201–1205 ( C2003)
Photos courtesy of squattypotty.com

In the spirit of full disclosure, this is an affiliate link, which means that I may get a commission if you decide to purchase anything from squattypotty.com. I only recommend products & systems that I use and love myself, so I know you’ll be in good hands.

Categories: Constipation, Hemorrhoids, Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), Squatty potty

Post by Mary Falk PT on September 20, 2013

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Switching from sitting to squatting need not be difficult. All that is needed is placing the Squatty Potty platform around the front of the commode.

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