Restoration Physical Therapy
Photo representing Much more than a Walk in the Park

Much More Than A Walk In The Park

Changing your brain: Get outside in nature.

Need a ‘Pick me Up?’

Could it be that something as simple as a walk in nature would be the mental ‘pick me up’ that you need to combat unhealthy thinking patterns such as brooding? Brooding, or rumination, is that broken record replaying of negative thoughts and is a precursor for depression. Does spending time amidst green, lush trees and away from the hustle and bustle of city life affect the brain?

A recent study was published that investigates the effect of nature-walking on brain activity and mental health. Gregory Bratman, a doctoral student at the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at Stanford University, investigated the differences within the subgenual prefrontal cortex and mental health attributes of rumination as a result of taking a solitary walk in a lush, green park as compared to an urban area.

The study found that there was significant improvement in emotional health and less brain activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain associated with ruminating thought processes. To learn more about the details of this study, click here….

Categories: Healthy Living, Holistic Medicine
Post by Mary Falk PT on July 25, 2015

Much more than a Walk in the Park

Changing your brain: Get outside in nature.

Need a ‘Pick me Up?’

Could it be that something as simple as a walk in nature would be the mental ‘pick me up’ that you need to combat unhealthy thinking patterns such as brooding? Brooding, or rumination, is that broken record replaying of negative thoughts and is a precursor for depression. Does spending time amidst green, lush trees and away from the hustle and bustle of city life affect the brain?

A recent study was published that investigates the effect of nature-walking on brain activity and mental health. Gregory Bratman, a doctoral student at the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at Stanford University, investigated the differences within the subgenual prefrontal cortex and mental health attributes of rumination as a result of taking a solitary walk in a lush, green park as compared to an urban area.

The study found that there was significant improvement in emotional health and less brain activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain associated with ruminating thought processes. To learn more about the details of this study, click here….

Categories: Healthy Living, Holistic Medicine

Post by Mary Falk PT on July 25, 2015

Restorative Categories

 
Share with your friends

The differences within the subgenual prefrontal cortex and mental health attributes of rumination as a result of taking a solitary walk

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.