Restoration Physical Therapy
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Anchor your Ribs

Anchoring your ribs with reaching overhead is an everyday activity that is helpful towards healing your diastasis recti.

Simple movements during everyday activities can be helping or hurting you when it comes to your abdominal muscles. One such movement is reaching overhead. We do it everyday when we reach something from a high cupboard or shelf. Learning an easy movement concept can help protect the abdominal muscles from added strain and injury (Diastasis Recti) to the tissue that connects the abdominal muscles in the midline. This simple movement is called “Anchor your Ribs.”

Diastasis Recti

The rectus abdominus muscles in the front of the abdomen are connected in the middle by the linea alba.  Occasionally the linea alba loses its supportive function and the two rectus muscles separate. This condition is called Diastasis Recti. It commonly occurs as a result of pregnancy and the added load on the abdominal wall, but occurs in women who have not been pregnant, infants, and also men.Diastasis Recti

 

Unfortunately, there is not an easy fix or one or two simple exercises to correct Diastasis Recti. This is because it is a whole body issue. Your anatomy is subject to the forces you create as you move which puts added strain on the linea alba.  What you do during the entirety of your day impacts your propensity to acquire this condition or helps your healing.

Anchor your Ribs while Reaching Overhead

Let’s start with one such simple movement done numerous times during your day; reaching overhead. A convenient movement strategy for this task is to hinge the spine and arch your back in order to reach that item on the top shelf. This puts added stress on the linea alba.

The corrective action is the simple movement of anchoring your ribs in front.  It is a small DOWN and back movement of the ribcage. Basically, you are aligning the ribcage directly over the pelvis. As you lift your arm up with your ribcage anchored, you will feel your abdominals engage. Make sure to exhale and do not hold your breath. If you feel your spine start to extend, or backward bend, you have gone too far. You may need to get a step stool to get that item.

Small changes done over a long period of time yield great results. Incorporating simple movement patterns throughout the day such as anchoring your ribs with reaching overhead is one of many steps in the right direction toward healing your Diastasis Recti.

To learn more about how to check for diastasis recti, click on the image below or order Katy Bowman’s book, Diastasis Recti.

How To Check For Diastasis Recti

This hope is a strong and trustworthy anchor for our souls. It leads us through the curtain into God’s inner sanctuary.   Heb. 6:19

 

In the spirit of full disclosure, I am an affiliate on links in this blog, which means that I may get a commission if you decide to purchase a product or membership. I only recommend products & systems that I use and love myself, so I know you’ll be in good hands.

Categories: Diastasis Recti
Post by Mary Falk PT on August 18, 2017

Anchor your Ribs

Anchoring your ribs with reaching overhead is an everyday activity that is helpful towards healing your diastasis recti.

Simple movements during everyday activities can be helping or hurting you when it comes to your abdominal muscles. One such movement is reaching overhead. We do it everyday when we reach something from a high cupboard or shelf. Learning an easy movement concept can help protect the abdominal muscles from added strain and injury (Diastasis Recti) to the tissue that connects the abdominal muscles in the midline. This simple movement is called “Anchor your Ribs.”

Diastasis Recti

The rectus abdominus muscles in the front of the abdomen are connected in the middle by the linea alba.  Occasionally the linea alba loses its supportive function and the two rectus muscles separate. This condition is called Diastasis Recti. It commonly occurs as a result of pregnancy and the added load on the abdominal wall, but occurs in women who have not been pregnant, infants, and also men.Diastasis Recti

 

Unfortunately, there is not an easy fix or one or two simple exercises to correct Diastasis Recti. This is because it is a whole body issue. Your anatomy is subject to the forces you create as you move which puts added strain on the linea alba.  What you do during the entirety of your day impacts your propensity to acquire this condition or helps your healing.

Anchor your Ribs while Reaching Overhead

Let’s start with one such simple movement done numerous times during your day; reaching overhead. A convenient movement strategy for this task is to hinge the spine and arch your back in order to reach that item on the top shelf. This puts added stress on the linea alba.

The corrective action is the simple movement of anchoring your ribs in front.  It is a small DOWN and back movement of the ribcage. Basically, you are aligning the ribcage directly over the pelvis. As you lift your arm up with your ribcage anchored, you will feel your abdominals engage. Make sure to exhale and do not hold your breath. If you feel your spine start to extend, or backward bend, you have gone too far. You may need to get a step stool to get that item.

Small changes done over a long period of time yield great results. Incorporating simple movement patterns throughout the day such as anchoring your ribs with reaching overhead is one of many steps in the right direction toward healing your Diastasis Recti.

To learn more about how to check for diastasis recti, click on the image below or order Katy Bowman’s book, Diastasis Recti.

How To Check For Diastasis Recti

This hope is a strong and trustworthy anchor for our souls. It leads us through the curtain into God’s inner sanctuary.   Heb. 6:19

 

In the spirit of full disclosure, I am an affiliate on links in this blog, which means that I may get a commission if you decide to purchase a product or membership. I only recommend products & systems that I use and love myself, so I know you’ll be in good hands.

Categories: Diastasis Recti

Post by Mary Falk PT on August 18, 2017

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Simple movements during everyday activities can be helping or hurting you when it comes to your abdominal muscles.

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